This Engraved House is a stylish remodel of a fairly plain looking building that over the years has served as a boarding house and convenience store. The newly clad exterior walls feature original engravings drawn using traditional bone tools. But what caught my eye is that, into these same walls, the current owners also stamped the names of all owners of the land and building, from the Algonquin Indians to present-day. Finally, they also stamped an exact copy of the original property deed into the once-wet cement.

engraved names of previous owners

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Photo by Dwell

According to author and historian Amanda Vickery, our passion for property began with the Georgians, who in the 1700s spurred a great property boom complete with the first property developers, streets of brick terraces erected after the Great Fire, new fashions in glazing, wallpapering, plasterwork and distinctly chirpy colours.

photo of georgian mansion interior

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With an estimated value of over US$1 billion, this 27-story high-rise gives a whole new meaning to single-family home. Billed as the most expensive home in history, it took seven years to build and is now home to just one six-member family in Mumbai, India.


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Fans of the retro TV hit, Mad Men, will enjoy the virtual tour of this well preserved 1950s home. Light up a smoke and step back into the era when the most modern of men were ad execs and everyone else, didn’t really count.

photo of bathroom circa 1950

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The Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy holds its annual conference in Cincinnati this week.
dwivedi-schiff house, cincinnati
The conference includes tours of three local homes designed by Wright, as well as his Westcott House in Springfield and several other modern homes and buildings, including the Dwivedi-Schiff house pictured above.

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Have you ever literally left a mark on a home you’ve lived in? As we were selling our family home and packing up a lifetime of contents, one of our final tasks was to take our ailing Dad into the basement where he could reach up and sign a beam with a permanent marker. There was not a dry eye in the house.

photo of ship carved into wood
Photo: Gordon Chibroski/ Home and Garden Staff Photographer

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This online opinion stresses the importance to ensuring the accuracy of a home’s history. As well, it details several characteristics that defined homes – or stations – along the Underground Railroad.

photo of the anderson house on the underground railroad
Photo: Trella Romine

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It’s not often that one comes across a photo of a burning house in the family photo album. Even in black and white, this image illustrates a scale and speed of loss. It also tells how the people scrambled to save whatever furniture and belongings they could retrieve, before the home was completely engulfed.

photo of house on fire

To read more about this house, visit Historyofhomes.net

With the hot weather this summer, the chat among home history lovers soon turns to the era of the traditional sleeping porch. Hambleton House in Easton, Maryland, sports a grand porch on its second floor where I am sure many a nap has been accommodated over the home’s 200-year history.

hambleton house
To read more about sleeping on the porch, check out this post on the This Old House blog. It’s a good read, just before you head out to doze off.

This New York City Museum brings to life the stories of immigrants who lived at 97 Orchard Street, a tenement built in 1863 on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. I especially enjoyed the Virtual Tour and the Immigation Game in the PLAY section. Hope to visit some day.

new york tenement interior

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